Beyond JSON

JSON pretty clearly won and won big. This is perhaps inevitable given the dominance of Javascript. And that’s ok! JSON is a pretty decent sort of sexpr and having both lists and dicts makes it pretty useful for quicky externalisation of all sorts of data. The friction, in a typical scripting derived language, of manipulating JSON in memory is super low. Slinging dicts and lists is something any Python (or Javascript, or…) programmer is going to find congenial.

But it has some infelicities and I just don’t mean the lack of query and schema languages (which is sorta being addressed). JSON is rather annoying to hand author and doesn’t seem great for documents and document formats. Or even hacking existing documents like HTML…if only because there’s no standard reflection of HTML structure into JSON.

There are some moves to improve this situation.

JSON5 tackles the writability. Probably the biggest move is not having to quote (certain) keys in objects. That helps both reading and writing! For reading, there’s a clear visual difference between key strings and “value” strings. For writing, less quoting!!

The other big one is multi-line strings (with the ‘\’ as the continuation character). Having to have a continuation character sucks, but it’s much better than the status quo ante.

Comments are also a good idea! The rest seem minor, but these definitely make a difference.

Mark Notation is aimed at bringing XML-like structuring and extensibility to JSON. It does this by adding a key syntactic (and semantic!) extension, the Mark object which is a name (thing tag/element name), a set of properties (think attributes, but with complex contents), and a list of content objects (think child content). It builds on JSON5 so has those authoring felicities.

Semantically, Mark objects get mapped into pretty simple Javascript objects. I don’t fully understand this claim:

contents: an ordered list of content objects, which are like child nodes of elements in HTML/XML. Mark utilizes a novel feature of JS that JS object can be array-like. It can store both named properties and indexed properties.

I don’t see why this matters as you have a special Mark object with has an explicit contents variable. Ah, maybe:

properties: can be accessed through markObj.prop or markObj[‘prop’] when prop is not a proper JS identifier. You can also use JS for … in loop to iterate through the properties. Unlike normal JS array, Mark object has been specially constructed so that Mark contents are not enumerable, thus do not appear in for … in loop.
contents: can be accessed through markObj[index]. You can also use JS for … of loop to iterate through the content items.

So you don’t have to do a field access but just can use special loops. I don’t see that this would be painful in, say, Python even with field accessing. I might default to making Python Mark Objects iteratable over the contents (on the theory that that’s more “normal”).

It would be interesting to compare APIs to see whether this really brings JSON like easy of programmer use.

And, of course, there’s YAML, which you can think of as JSON++++. (JSON is a subset these days.) It’s designed from the ground up for writability and capturing complex structures. And that it does. The price is considerably more complexity. Like a ton more. (You can define entity like things (actually, more like IDs) on the fly! Inline!) It has excellent embedded complex multiline strings (essentially “here-strings“).

I have to say that it might be easier to grow Mark Notation a bit toward YAML than the reverse. Here-like-strings plus id references go a long way.



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