Software Gripes: Scrivener and ConcertWindow (and WordPress)

April 16, 2016

I think I need regular “features” i.e., columns of a particular type or theme, to keep the blogging going, so here’s a new one near and dear to my hard: ranting about software problems (I’ll through in other system gripes but the most common is software).

Scrivener

I want to love Scrivener. It certainly is enticing, if a bit complex. I’m trying to use it as a course materials (lectures, quizzes, etc.) management and editing tool. People certainly seem to have had some success with it as such. I think it could also be handy for paper or book writing and esp. grant writing. Grants have VERY complex and finicky structure which Scrivener’s “break it into bits” and “annotate and organise” and “hey, templates all the way down” approach looks to be quite good.

But there’s a fundamental problem: The whole Scrivener model is “compiling” the project into a single final document. Really. Uhm…that’s bonkers. Even if your final output is conceptually a single book, you very well may want the “out of Scrivener” view to be split up in multiple files. (Think Website with a separate HTML page per Chapter. Or just Website.)  For courses, I don’t want one output to contain it all, I want lots of documents (syllabus, references, slides broken out by day or by lecture, quizzes, lab sheets, etc.) Scrivener HAS THAT STRUCTURE, but, as far as I can tell, it doesn’t like to spit it out. You can “export” the file structure, and maybe that will turn out to be good enough. (I only figured that out today.) But I want some of the structure to be flattened! E.g., if I make a Lecture which has separate subdocuments as “slides”, for some workflows they should be combined! But the whole Lecture shouldn’t be combined with all the other lectures. (Except for the global print version.)

Ok, “export” at least lets me write my own custom compiler. But then why do I have to deal with the “project” structure and explicitly set “export”? Why can’t a project just be a directory/file structure in the file system. In other words, why “export”? That adds a really painful step to the process. It makes synching harder, etc.

Additionally, Scrivener has some simple WYSIWIG formatting (bold, italic, tables, lists, etc.) It also has export to MultiMarkdown. This all seems extremely promising for downstream processing: Write using the GUI, explore to Markdown, then run tools that parse and manipulate the Markdown to generate the final versions.

Oh, silly me! All Scrivener does is compile snippets written in MultiMarkdown to other formats (HTML or PDF via LaTeX)! You have to write the Markdown.

Well that sucks. It’s not like Scrivener is a word class Markdown editor with syntax checking etc. The key formatting features it supports in the GUI are eminently Markdownable, so why not export to it? Indeed, for things like Tables, having a reasonable GUI is much much nicer than hacking Markdown syntax directly. Sigh.

Finally, they have this cork board view. Before 2.7, it defaulted to a cork textured background and index card looking cards. Very skeuomorphic, but in a good way. It took you out of the UI and forced a cognitive mode shift. 2.7 it defaulted to a “flat” interface that was 1) bland and 2) merged it visually with every other view.

Sigh. But wait! You can tweak it back. But now, in my preferred Index Card style, they stuck a pushpin.

screenshot_03Why, why, why, why?! It doesn’t read; it doesn’t help; it forces a “vertical” orientation (I actually viewed them as piles before). This little tumour does exactly nothing positive. It serves no visual-informatics purpose and, indeed, distracts. It’s centred, bright, and in line with meaningful information. This is skeuomorphic madness, where the designer slavishly emulates the real world object without thinking about the design. Pushpins are not a useful information part of the design…they are there to hold the cards in place. If you lay the cork board flat, you don’t need them.

“But Bijan,” you say, “the cork only exists to have pins pushed in! Isn’t that the same problem?”

No, gentle reader, while the cork in the real object is there functionally to be stuck with pins, it has several user interface functions: 1) visual mode switching; it’s a very strong cue about the difference in working style; it provides an information cue, 2) it supports the illusion without affecting other information per se, and 3) it is high contrast yet not obtrusive. The main problem with skuomorphism is that people take it too far. The idea shouldn’t be to exactly replicate the real world object, but to design an interface that works. Flat interfaces general suck because they generally designed that chrome should be indistinguishable from content (or not be perceptible at all) and content should have few sub distinguishing features. (Microsoft’s Metro interface is something of an exception.)

ConcertWindow

Zoe tried to do a ConcertWindow concert last Sunday. There were numerous technical hassles, but we managed to struggle through most of them and have a reasonable concert which most viewers could see most of. One cool feature is that you can get the full recording of the stream and the website lets you post a one song snippet of the recording on their website. This was exactly what we wanted to promote the new album (in progress).

We do not have such a recording.

The reason we do not have one is that they have a “feature” that is supposed to help you debug your streaming. For a given concert slot, you can set up a “test” session which will not be exposed to anyone except your testers and can happen at other times than your scheduled slot. This sounded sensible, but there were a few problems:

  1. It doesn’t work from the iOS app, which is how were were going to broadcast the concert. Grr. But ok, we can at least test the basic setup via the browser version.
  2. Testing via the browser version just doesn’t help very much. You still need to test via the iOS app. A lot. So we were scheduling test concerts all over the place. That was better in someways, since that’s what exposed that the “Pay what you want” option is really “Pay what you want as long as it is at least $1”. Grr.
  3. When you go to look at your video, the prepend “for your reference” all the test video you did. What? Why? Who wants that? Who wants that in their concert recording? Shouldn’t you just save that as a separate file, if at all? Weird.
  4. Oh, and if you tested in your browser, but recorded from iOS, you now have a video that is half test video and half corrupted nothing. That’s right, the “test” mode can corrupt your concert recording. So we have no video of the concert, whatsoever.
  5. In the FAQ for “Preparing for the show” they have “How can I sound check before the show?” which says

    Choose if you’re going to broadcast with Web, iOS, or RTMP, then switch to “Test” mode and start broadcasting. No one will be able to see it on your channel. Click the “Test URL” link below the broadcaster and you’ll be able to see your test stream in real time. You can also send this link to a friend.

    In the FAQ for  “After the show” they have “My archived video file has errors and/or the recording is corrupted” (it’s on the SECOND PAGE of this FAQ)

    This can sometimes happen if you broadcasted to the same show via multiple devices (iOS + laptop) or in different frame rates / formats.

    To avoid this happening, be sure to broadcast to each show using only one device and one video/audio format.

    If you do broadcast using multiple devices or formats, the live stream will work totally fine, but the archived recording may be corrupted.

    So, the advice they give before hand can corrupt your recording because they have a feature (prepending test video) which is completely worthless. And their own help leads you there.

Message to the ConcertWindow programmers who did this: Never corrupt important data. Never. Ever. Especially don’t corrupt real data with test data. I mean…come on. Shame

Message to the ConcerWindow documentation writers who did this: If there is a risk of data corruption…DON’T RECOMMEND ACTIONS THAT RAISE THAT RISK. Oh, and WARN PEOPLE ABOUT THE RISK AND HOW TO MITIGATE IT before they might do the action that destroys their data.

You should be profoundly ashamed of yourselves.

While we’re talking documentation nonsense, let’s consider this gem:

At Concert Window, we give the artist a full private copy of their show, for free. You can use it for any non-commercial use, including uploading it to YouTube. 

The video files are in .mp4 format, which is playable with most major video players including VLC and can be imported into iMovie and Final Cut Pro.

Sometimes, due to errors during broadcast or other reasons, the video files may be corrupted or unplayable. In that case we’re sorry but there’s nothing we can do. This is part of why we offer video archives as a free service.

In addition to downloading your full show recording, you can also create a short highlight video. Here’s an article with more details: How to create a highlight video

*Artists are not allowed to sell their show videos due to copyright restrictions.

First, note the “or other reasons” for corruption…like BEING MISLED BY THE DOCUMENTATION TO HIT A DESIGN BUG WHICH IS KNOWN TO CORRUPT YOUR CONCERT. Maybe you should fix that.

Second, note the nonsense of the highlight blocks. Zoe owns the copyright for the songs she played and the performance. The terms of service explicitly SAYS that she owns the copyright.

(BTW, the terms of service are absurd and horrible. I’ll break that out in another post.)

WordPress

Current gripe: Adding a category doesn’t put the new category under the parent one you’ve selected.

Also, I want to have categories be more meaningful. I’m currently inserting two key categories into my post title (see current post’s title): Music Monday and Software Gripe. This is wrong. I’m polluting my title with Metadata about my post in order to get the visual effect I want. Boo!

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